Times that try men’s souls

The last thing anyone expected in March was an out-of-control virus that would be wreaking havoc on our lives and livelihoods. Instead of University of Louisville basketball, one is keeping with updates on infections and deaths and the latest restrictions on individual movement.

Charlie Springer during happier times at Jim Patterson Stadium (Barbara Springer photo).

The numbers keep going up and up, with no relief in sight. Doubling every other day it seems. The only positive coming from China, which claims the new cases are slowing down. Problem is the chicoms have little credibility, having tried to conceal the danger until it was wildly out of control.

So one waits. Waits for what? No solutions coming soon. One is left to wonder about the chances of contracting the virus. To wonder if one may have already been infected. To see when local testing will be available. To wonder when one will be able to see family, friends and loved ones again without threatening them or ourselves.

Someone at the Centers for Disease Control stated that if you’re not overacting to the threat, you’re probably not preparing enough. So one washes one’s hands several times a day, wears gloves on trips to Kroger or to Walgreen’s or any other shopping trips. Spraying bleach on door knobs, sinks, other surfaces, hoping it’s just in time, not too late.

Each day pretty much the same. No NCAA basketball tournament action to distract from the daily doom and gloom. The simulations on YouTube of computerized games just a depressing reminder of what we’re really missing. No quick trips out to Jim Patterson Stadium to see a UofL baseball team that ranked No. 1 in most of the pre-season polls. Just left to anticipate someday going out to Cardinal Stadium or down to the KFC Yum! Center.

No going to church services on Sunday, doing high fives with fellow UofL fans, no taunting of people who follow Kentucky. No ability to worship or pray collectively. Avoiding other religious services, including funerals … or visitation services for that matter.

Waiting for grandson Koby, a college junior, to arrive from Florida, having to leave his dormitory at Florida Gulf Coast University and his job with Sprint.  The school and the company each forced to take actions to protect the individuals, the people they come into contact with, along with the institution and the business.

Hoping son Steve and his family four hours away in Murray are doing okay. Giving thanks that he has gotten over two bouts with the flu. Regretting not being able to make the trip, with all the differences in ages and the warnings about small and large group gatherings.

Thankful for a spouse who is good at dealing with a wide variety of different challenges, willing to make sacrifices and puts family first. Her being a great cook and a rabid UofL fan are qualities that make her even more loved and indispensable.

Challenging times, one never knows what to expect next. Some day this particular challenge will be another one of those events that altered the course of humanity. Hopefully, it will make us stronger and better prepared for what is coming our way.

For now, we have our hands full just getting through this one.