Louisville football ready to start … whenever

Still plenty of uncertainty surrounding the start of the college football season. With the good ol’  coronavirus pandemic hanging around forever, all options are still on the table. A decision is expected to be made by the Atlantic Coast Conference by the end of the month.
 
Will the season go ahead as planned at the start of September? Could there be a delay and a shortened schedule? Could it even get canceled altogether?
 
The uncertainty comes from the lack of light at the end of the tunnel regarding the number of daily new cases in the United States. While other countries have been able to plan and then execute the start of competitive sports, that was only possible after the number of new cases dramatically declined and stabilized.
 
So, we wait anxiously and in hope. The first game is scheduled Sept. 2 against NC State Wolfpack and all Scott Satterfield can do is prepare his players as best he can in the circumstances – and that, he says, is what he’s doing each day.
 
“We will worry about today and then tomorrow we will worry about tomorrow,” Satterfield told the media last week. “I think it’s so hard to project and see where we are going to be. We have to focus on the here and now.”
 
The Cardinals started working through their three-phase summer program on June 8 and started player-led practices on July 13. Louisville is slated to begin fall camp on Aug. 4. The team is also working through its installation process with the veterans on campus while assisting the rookies getting up to speed with the playbook.
 
The Cards were about halfway through sprint practice before the coronavirus pandemic struck and halted the rest of the training camp. Preparation is the aim of the game at this stage.
 
“If you said we are going to play in a couple weeks that we could put a great product on the field, like in two weeks. I feel that good about it,” Satterfield said.
 
Before the start of last season, there were few expectations surround the Cardinals, but after an 8-5 year and a bowl win, hype is higher this time round. “We have a bunch of veterans and a bunch of guys who played a bunch of ball on both sides of the ball,” Satterfield said. “They feel really good about what we are doing right now.
 
“We will get to Aug 4. and get back to our install. A lot of it will be determined by how our guys grasp it. I feel good about our first guys. We have a lot of guys back. I think we can escalate some of the install with our veterans but as you look to guys that our newcomers you have to be careful. We will play that by ear. Certainty feel so much better than where we were a year ago. I hope we will be able to grow and build off what we did last year and piggyback off that.”
 
Other industries have been able to pivot during the COVID-19 crisis to soften the economic blow of lockdowns and stay-at-home orders. Millions of people have been able to work from home, fitness trainers have launched home workouts, and gambling operators have seen a rise in online casino betting after shutting the doors of land-based casinos.
 
Working from home and offering internet-focused services are, of course, simply not possible for competitive sports. We have seen with the NBA, the UFC, and many other organizations the extreme measures needed to be taken to create a bio-secure “bubble” that allows sports to be held in the current climate.
 
You can still bet on sports events online and if you know how to read betting odds you might get some profit during lockdown, but still the events lack the atmosphere that only fans can recreate.
 
The same applies to the Cards who have been practicing within a secure bubble and junior receiver Tutu Atwell is grateful that the team are able to live and train in safe conditions.
 
“When we were home there was a pretty good chance to get virus, get sick, getting together has been a good thing, near each other every day, just around us, even weekends, we don’t go out,” Atwell said. “So, no-one can get the virus, this is a great thing.
 
“We are very curious whether we’ll play or not, we wanna play, we want the season to start on time, and whenever it does, we’ll be ready to go.”
 
Whether or not the Cards and the rest of the NCAAF start the season as planned in a few weeks, all Satterfield, Atwell, and the rest of the program can do is be prepared.e Cardinals ready to start – whenever that might be
 
There is still plenty of uncertainty surrounding the start of the college football season. Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, all options are thought to still be on the table and a decision is expected to be made by the NCAA by the end of the month.
 
Will the season go ahead as planned at the end of August/start of September? Could there be a delay and a shortened schedule? Could it even get canceled altogether?
 
The uncertainty comes from the lack of light at the end of the tunnel regarding the number of daily new cases in the United States. While other countries have been able to plan and then execute the start of competitive sports, that was only possible after the number of new cases dramatically declined and stabilized.
 
So, we wait anxiously and in hope. For the Louisville Cardinals, the first game is scheduled for Sept. 2 against NC State Wolfpack and all Scott Satterfield can do is prepare his players as best he can in the circumstances – and that, he says, is what he’s doing each day.
 
“We will worry about today and then tomorrow we will worry about tomorrow,” Satterfield told the media on Monday. “I think it’s so hard to project and see where we are going to be. We have to focus on the here and now.”
 
The Cardinals started working through their three-phase summer program on June 8 and started player-led practices on July 13. Louisville is slated to begin fall camp on Aug. 4. The team is also working through its installation process with the veterans on campus while assisting the rookies getting up to speed with the playbook.
 
The Cards were about halfway through sprint practice before the coronavirus pandemic struck and halted the rest of the training camp.
 
Preparation is the aim of the game at this stage.
 
“If you said we are going to play in a couple weeks that we could put a great product on the field, like in two weeks. I feel that good about it,” Satterfield said.
 
Before the start of last season, there were few expectations surround the Cardinals, but after an 8-5 year and a bowl win, hype is higher this time round.
 
“We have a bunch of veterans and a bunch of guys who played a bunch of ball on both sides of the ball,” Satterfield said. “They feel really good about what we are doing right now.
 
“We will get to Aug 4. and get back to our install. A lot of it will be determined by how our guys grasp it. I feel good about our first guys. We have a lot of guys back. I think we can escalate some of the install with our veterans but as you look to guys that our newcomers you have to be careful. We will play that by ear. Certainty feel so much better than where we were a year ago. I hope we will be able to grow and build off what we did last year and piggyback off that.”
 
Other industries have been able to pivot during the COVID-19 crisis to soften the economic blow of lockdowns and stay-at-home orders. Millions of people have been able to work from home, fitness trainers have launched home workouts, and gambling operators have seen a rise in online casino betting after shutting the doors of land-based casinos.
 
Working from home and offering internet-focused services are, of course, simply not possible for competitive sports. We have seen with the NBA, the UFC, and many other organizations the extreme measures needed to be taken to create a bio-secure “bubble” that allows sports to be held in the current climate.
 
You can still bet on sports events online and if you know how to read NBA odds you might get some profit during lockdown, but still the events lack the atmosphere that only fans can recreate.
 
The same applies to the Cards who have been practicing within a secure bubble and junior receiver Tutu Atwell is grateful that the team are able to live and train in safe conditions.
 
“When we were home there was a pretty good chance to get virus, get sick, getting together has been a good thing, near each other every day, just around us, even weekends, we don’t go out,” Atwell said. “So, no-one can get the virus, this is a great thing.
 
“We are very curious whether we’ll play or not, we wanna play, we want the season to start on time, and whenever it does, we’ll be ready to go.”
 
Whether or not the Cards and the rest of the NCAAF start the season as planned in a few weeks, all Satterfield, Atwell, and the rest of the program can do is be prepared.

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