Vince Tyra: Louisville football ready to win again

Thomas Jackson, a senior wide receiver, and Luke Massad, a senior long snapper, enjoyed the kickoff luncheon at a table with University of Louisville fans.

“It’s another day, it’s another season, and in the spirt of looking forward and not looking back at last year, this has been a traditional winning football program and it will remain a winning program.”

Vince Tyra enters the 2019 season with high expectations for the UofL football team under Scott Satterfield.

With that promise, Athletic Director Vince Tyra greeted a crowd of between 1,400 and 1,500 fans during the University of Louisville’s annual Kickoff Luncheon on Monday at the Downtown Marriott Inn. A crowd wanting to put last season in the past, eager to write some new chapters in UofL football.

“Winning in the classroom, winning in the community, and winning on the field are key attributes of this program and this athletic department,” he continued. “We have hungry players who are ready to go. They’re talented,  they’re ready to be competitive today. Right now. They are anxious to show you the real them. The players believe they are ready, and so do I.”

Not sure who Tyra was seeking to persuade the most, the coaches, the players, the fans or himself. But he certainly wanted everyone to know he is setting the bar high for Louisville football, even during a rebuilding year. A year after everybody gave up on each other in one of the most disappointing football seasons ever.

“The key to leadership is the transfer of beliefs and values to those you are leading, essential to the culture we have created in the athletic department and which Coach Scott Satterfield has created in our football program,” Tyra continued.

“The transferring of beliefs is contagious. We are seeing our players infect each other on a daily basis with a positive approach — otherwise known as attitude and effort. It has been a tremendous eight months getting to know Coach Satterfield, his family and a terrific staff he has assembled. I bought into his leadership and program attributes last December and I am going to be committed to working my butt off to make him successful.”

Tyra believes something special is happening with Louisville football, noting that season ticket sales are up by more than 2,000 seats and rising. “The fans play a key role,” he concluded. “We need to you create that home field advantage. The players won’t let us down, they are going to lift us up, and we’ll see you at Cardinal Stadium on Sept. 2.”

Losing is not an option for Vince Tyra.

 

Hey Vince, UofL Golf Course a great setting for Cardinal Caravans

Bring back the Cardinal Caravans.

The observer made it out to Simpsonville on Monday for the annual Press Box Classic at the University of Louisville Golf Club. A welcome respite from the dearth of UofL activities in which to become engaged over the past several weeks.

A reunion of sorts for many of the sportswriters, the bloggers, the broadcasters, the personalities gathering once again for a fun event. The decibel meter reaching peak levels, with the media types and occasional golfers enjoying the free golf, the pulled pork sandwiches, the door prizes and familiar faces.

Kenny Klein is there, of course, overseeing the 21st annual event, along with Athletic Director Vince Tyra, Baseball Coach Dan McDonnell and Volleyball Coach Dani Keely, and Women’s Athletic Director Christine Herring.

“We’re just here to have fun, have a good time and enjoy each other,” he says. “One of my favorite events every year, getting to know people we work with on a more casual basis in a great setting.”

And what a great setting it is.

The UofL Golf Club has undergone significant changes since being purchased by the University five years ago, investing more than $11 million into the golf program’s home course. Changes include numerous new water hazards, new tee sites and longer holes, and continued modernization of the clubhouse and dining facilities.

One thing that has been missing on the UofL calendar the last three years has been the Cardinal Caravan. These were great events, enabling fans, coaches, players, cheerleaders, Ladybirds and pep band members to mingle in an informal atmosphere.

The need for such an event is even greater considering all the changes that have occurred over the last three years on campus. Fans deserve opportunities to get to know UofL people better, the people they have remained faithful and supportive of during some very challenging times.

Having the event at the Simpsonsville venue would be a great way to show off one of the University’s most desirable facilities, a great promotion for the club, probably resulting in some new memberships and strengthening relationships between UofL and its many fans.

Bring back the Cardinal Caravans, Vince. There’s no better setting than the UofL Golf Club.

Report: Cardinal Stadium cabooses safe for now

Halfway through another one of those long hot summers and, thus far, UofL has managed to avoid any of those mid-summer controversies that seemed to plague UofL over the last decade. One of those boring long hot summers, thank goodness.

Six weeks to go, however, keeping the fingers crossed.

College athletics being what they, disruption of the status quo is a constant threat, often lingering beneath the surface, capable of surfacing at any time. No word from the NCAA about the after effects of the FBI probe and how Louisville basketball will be impacted.

The University of Louisville baseball team kept the excitement going until late June, reaching the College World Series for the fifth time in 13 seasons. This time making to college baseball’s final four before losing to Vanderbilt, the eventual national champion.

Not much else for UofL fans to get excited about unless one closely follows  the recruitment on unpredictable teenage athletes. The most significant news has been the announcement from Athletic Director Vince Tyra that approximately 42,000 seats are being painted at Cardinal Stadium this summer.

Apparently the threat of Cardinal Stadium losing the cabooses that emerged in mid-March has gone away. The UofL Athletic Association was threatening not to renew the leases of the 14 cabooses, making only about $15,000 annually in that prime space.

The word from a source close to the situation told Card Game this week that “Maury (Buchart, who owns the cabooses) is keeping them, the U has kinda let it go. too many big donors complained, status quo for a while.”

So that’s good news, at least on the game day atmosphere front. Maybe not so great from the revenue raising side.

Stay tuned. Dog days of summer straight ahead.

Scott Satterfield brings expectations for Louisville football

A new face with a refreshing outlook.

There’s a new man in the coach’s office at the Schnellenberger football complex today, an individual who just a couple of weeks ago couldn’t have imagined being there. But there he is sorting through the roster, figuring out who’s going, who’s on the fence and who’s staying with just two weeks before national signing day.

Scott Satterfield has taken on a difficult challenge, that of reversing the fortunes of the University of Louisville football team. A program that tumbled over the cliff this past season, losing its last nine games while allowing more than 50 points on six different occasions. Turning that around could be seen as a daunting task for many coaches.

Athletic Director Vince Tyra, undaunted by a turndown by former UofL great Jeff Brohm, said he was interested in Satterfield from the beginning, fascinated with how Appalachian State had dominated the Sun Belt Conference. Narrow overtime losses to Tennessee and Penn State also intrigued him.

“We wanted a winner, and I wanted someone to want us as badly as we wanted him,” said Tyra. “There was competition for Scott in this process, and I’m glad we were able to stay in front of the competition. He met all of our criteria and expectations. We looked at a number of people during the search process and kept coming back to Scott.”

Clearly Satterfield is able to see beyond the current difficulties, some seeming self-inflicted by the previous head coach, knowing what is possible at UofL.  “I want to compete for national championships one day. That’s what we’re going to be gunning for,” he said during introductory ceremonies.

“To be able to come and coach at this kind of a university to compete for championships, I can’t turn that down at this point in my career. This is what we’ve been shooting for.”

Welcome to Louisville, Scott Satterfield.

Jeff Brohm got what he wanted from Purdue and Louisville

Now that the Jeff Brohm dalliance has finally fizzled, the University of Louisville can consider some serious candidates. Brohm was never coming home, using UofL as a bargaining chip to further solidify his position at Purdue University.

No good vibes during the entire process, not from a family or from the University in which each party had invested so much. Little to no public communications from any of the Brohms, just enough winks and nods with selective media contacts to advance Jeff’s interests, keep playing his game.

While some around him indicated that he had considerable interest in Louisville, there was no indication from Brohm himself. Just the usual mumbo-jumbo coachspeak about being where he wanted to be. Taking his time, keeping everybody waiting, keeping his players, keeping Louisville fans guessing. 

No indications from friends and family members in Louisville that he was excited about being considered, possibly returning to his alma mater. No happy memories  about program where he, his dad and a brother had quarterbacked, another brother had been a wide receiver. 

Just silence. The kind of silence with an ominous feel to it all along.  Nothingness. Hurry up and wait. For what?

Brohm pretty much walked by the pond, saw us drowning, and took a seat at the picnic table ...

No one having a clue about Brohm was going to do. Not inspiring confidence, just enough to keep Louisville fans waiting and hoping, allowing the suspense to build to a fever pitch. Brohm has matured, gone on to other interests, and is no longer tuned into Louisville his hometown, or UofL 

No expressions of disappointment from Brohm about what had happened to Louisville football over the last year under Bobby Petrino’s direction. No obvious interest in rescuing the UofL program, or concern about what the University had been through over the past three years. The hometown boy had a set of priorities, but it’s clear now did not match up with Louisville’s.

As a poster on Louisville message board noted, “This program is at one of the lowest points we’ve seen and people viewed Brohm as the guy to take us to the next level, it was storybook. Instead Brohm pretty much walked by the pond, saw us drowning, and took a seat at the picnic table to watch.”

Brohm was focused of taking full advantage of the uncertainty in West Lafayette to nail down further concessions from Purdue. A big paycheck got much, much bigger with PU matching Louisville dollar for dollar. In the end, he is said to have improved his salary from a reported $3.8 million to an estimated $6 million annually.

Athletic Director Vince Tyra indicated Thursday morning that he never felt during the give and take (mostly give) with Brohm that the former Louisville quarterback was excited as Tyra was about the UofL job. Tyra saying it was clear that Brohm’s heart and mind were consumed with fulfilling his commitment to Purdue.

Tyra had no choice but to go after Brohm, make the best possible offer, let Brohm know he was badly needed, and wait for Brohm to quit stalling. Now Tyra is free to pursue someone who wants to be at UofL, “someone with the same energy and excitement going to work every day as myself, Chris Mack, Dan McDonnell and other UofL coaches.” Good for Vince, let our people go.

Brohm has made his choice, and Louisville respects that choice and wishes him well. Some have suggested that the timing was not right, and that UofL and Brohm could still get together some day. Don’t count on it, not when Jeff Brohm turned a cold shoulder to UofL football during a time of its greatest need.  Thanks but no thanks to football coaches who have little regard for UofL’s interests, now and in the future.