UK grad leads UofL legal team in settlement with Pitino

No one thought it would end like this, the long-time relationship between Rick Pitino and the University of Louisville. The sides agreeing to settle a two-year-old lawsuit brought against the school by the former head basketball coach.

Barbara Edelman, who earned her law degree at the UK College of Law, led the University of Louisville legal team in negotiations with Rick Pitino.

Ironically there was a University of Kentucky connection involved in the case, with UofL’s legal team led by Barbara Edelman. She’s a graduate of the UK College of Law and a partner at the Lexington office of the Dinsmore & Shohl law firm.

The terms were agreed to after an intense nine hours of negotiations in a Louisville court room last week.

Over the course of her career, Edelman has appeared in all of the federal district courts in, numerous circuit courts throughout the state and other jurisdictions. She has tried more than 50 jury trials in state and federal courts and handled more than 30 appeals to the Kentucky Court of Appeals, Kentucky Supreme Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

Steve Pence, Pitino’s attorney, also happens to be a graduate of the UK College of Law. He was served as U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Kentucky.

A collective sigh of relief coming from many Louisville fans, thankful that Pitino has ended his pursuit of approximately $40 million in contractual obligations. The former coach was never going to get the full amount but millions seemed almost certain.

Pitino decided, however, not to pursue any further action against the school. The best decision he could have made, both for his own reputation and for the sake of the university. Neither party would have benefitted from the inevitable rehashing of UofL controversies in the local and national media.

One would like to believe that Pitino gave up the lawsuit because of all the good times he enjoyed at UofL, all the people who supported him through the good and the bad. He had considerable accomplishments at the school, compiling a 559-416 won-lost record, coaching Louisville to three Final Fours and a national championship.

But there were all those down times as well, including the sex and extortion scandal involving Karen Sypher, the stripper parties with Katina Powell and her flock, and the accusations from the FBI about alleged Adidas involvement in the recruiting process. Pitino may enjoy being the center of attention but no way did he want to rehash all those times day after day in a local courtroom.

Barbara Edelman’s legal team also included Gramn Morgan, a UofL undergrad who earned his law degree in California, and Donna Perry, who heads the Louisville office of Dinsmore & Shohl and earned her degree from the UofL Brandeis School of Law.

That legal team may have saved the UofL tens of millions of dollars while sparing UofL fans another barrage of ugly reminders of Pitino’s darkest days in Louisville.

Fear for Lamar Jackson’s running game catching up with him

The real fun of watching Lamar Jackson play football comes when he takes off running, finding that crease in the offensive line, leaving defenders reaching for open air.  He brings a new dimension to the concept of a running game.

So fast, so elusive, a joy to watch.

There are numerous NFL football observers, however, expressing concern that Jackson may be running the ball too often.  In 16 games last season, he ran the ball a record 147 times for 695 yards and five rushing touchdowns. The pundits that provide the NFL betting tips would not be shocked if he runs the ball at an even higher clip this season. Basically, he’s one of the best runners in the NFL.

In contrast, Green Bay Packer quarterback Aaron Rodgers ran the ball only 43 times during the 2018 season. Following a recent exhibition game,  Rodgers expressed concern about Jackson’s proclivity for running the ball, stating, ““I love watching you play, man. That was spectacular. Have a great season. Slide a little bit.”

That’s what he does best, that’s why the fans buy tickets, why TV ratings for the Baltimore Ravens are soaring, and it’s what the opposition dreads.

Lamar Jackson ran for 50 touchdowns and passed for 69 more at the University of Louisville (Cindy Rice Shelton photo).

Jackson completely rewrote the record books at the University of Louisville. In three seasons, he ran for 4,132 yards and 50 touchdowns. Not a shrinking violet as a passer either, compiling 3,660 yards and 69 more touchdowns. Did it with notoriously weak offensive line units during his last two seasons, disguising numerous team deficiencies at UofL.

Count Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti is among the nervous , “Lamar is not going to be running 20 times a game,” he says. “That’s not what this offense is about.” Head Coach John Harbaugh doesn’t disagree, but, “It’s not like he’s trying to run, but sometimes … What are you going to do? You can’t hold him back forever. He looked good on the play. He looked good on a lot of plays.”

Jackson is aware of the concerns, knowing that injuries are an integral part of the game. The more involved a player is, the greater the possibility. But he’s going to enjoy the game, taking advantage of his God-given abilities, wanting to make the Ravens a title contender.

“I can’t talk about it,” Jackson said recently. “Each and every day we’re looking better and better in what we’re doing, whether … running the ball with our backs, or the pass game, it’s all looking incredible right now.”

All the talk about all the running game may be typical NFL bluster. Jackson’s running abilities make him dangerous, giving Baltimore an unpredictable offense. His ability to make the most of a collapsing play makes Jackson one of the most challenging to contain and among the entertaining runners ever.

UofL’s Bendapudi galvanizing force to rescue Jewish Hospital

Neeli Benedapudi was able to pull all of divergent forces together under a tight deadline for what appears to be unanimous support for the University of Louisville to rescue numerous health care facilities The hard part is getting it through the Kentucky Legislature..

Neeli Bendapudi has delivered the plan. Now it’s up to the state legislature.

The presence of the University of Louisville may soon be greatly magnified throughout this community, which has hopefully been spared massive losses in healthcare services for patients and jobs for health care providers.

Thanks to Dr. Bendapudi, Jewish Hospital will not be announcing plans this week to close its doors. The historic hospital, along with nine other health care facilities in the area, will soon be under the auspices of UofL.

The University will invest $10 million in purchasing all of the assets of Kentucky One from CommonSpirit Health, its Chicago-based parent company. CommonSpirit will forgive $19.7 million in outstanding promissory notes from University Medical Center Inc. UofL will receive more than $76 million of working capital in the form of accounts receivable and cash to meet future operating expenses.

The deal came together within two weeks after discussions about Jewish Hospital fell through with a potential private investor. Knowing that Louisville could not afford to be without the facilities, Bendapudi was able to marshal an almost unprecedented level of cooperation between city and state officials and political parties.

UofL also will acquire the following:

  • Frazier Rehab Institute
  • Sts. Mary & Elizabeth Hospital
  • Our Lady of Peace Hospital
  • Jewish Hospital, Shelbyville
  • Jewish Medical Centers East, Northeast, South and Southwest
  • Physician groups affiliated with KentuckyOne

Another integral part of the deal would include a $50 million loan from the state, subject to the approval of the Kentucky General Assembly. Governor Matt Bevin has endorsed the plan, along with the leaders of both parties in the Kentucky General Assembly. Getting something this important passed in Kentucky is always a struggle.

After years of struggle with the city’s healthcare challenges, there is reason for optimism again, providing hope that Louisville will again resume its pioneering role in medical research and quality health care.

She has a long list of names of people to credit, and their involvement was absolutely necessary, but Neeli Bendapudi is the driving force.

Jock Sutherland recalls fun times with Louisville basketball

Photo courtesy Room 17 Productions

Jock Sutherland hasn’t seen a University of Louisville basketball game in person since 2001. That’s a long time for a man who was immersed in the sport for most of his 90 years. But he’s still very much a UofL basketball fan, describing his time with the program as “one of my bonuses in life.”

Since he can’t play golf or travel for basketball games, he relies heavily on his big screen TV to follow the sports he loves. “Being 90 isn’t easy, you have to learn things all over again,” he said. “I see as many Louisville games as I can although it is sometimes a challenge finding UofL games in Central Kentucky.”

Jock Sutherland during his days at Lafayette High School in Lexington where he won a state basketball championship in 1979.

Sutherland was a member of the UofL basketball radio broadcast team from 1981 to 2001. He raised the concept of color commentator to another level, entertaining fans with a zany sense of humor, unrelenting candor and folksy stories. A former member of the University of Kentucky coaching staff, he was often critical of UK on the broadcasts.

The Observer caught up with Jock by telephone on Monday at his Nicholasville home that he shares with his wife Phyllis, adjacent to the Lone Oak Golf Course. He played golf regularly until about five years ago, often participating in UofL golf scrambles,  before being sidelined with arthritis in both knees.

Jock Sutherland with his son Charles, Jr., at the annual Press Box Golf Scramble at the UofL Golf Club in 2014 (Charlie Springer photo).

Sutherland, who coached Lafayette to the state high school championship in 1979, got his start in media a year later as an analyst with Dave Conrad at UofL games on WHAS TV. “We didn’t have replays in those days, and it was tough explaining the technical stuff,” he recalls.

When Conrad left for another job, Van Vance asked Jock to join the Louisville broadcast team.  “I had the worst voice in the world and I didn’t know anything about radio,” he said. “I was so bad we made a pretty good team. He just wanted me to talk so I talked. It was wonderful. I had a great time and got to know a lot of Louisville people. I wouldn’t take anything for that experience.”

Van Vance hired Jock Sutherland in 1981 to do color commentary for UofL basketball (WHAS Radio photo).

Sutherland and Vance have stayed in contact over the years, getting together at the Cracker Barrel in Lawrenceburg to rehash memories. “Van was a great guy to work with and quite a character,” he said. “He was the ultimate bachelor, with some quirky habits. He would eat supper at weird hours, nothing for him to go to Kroger at 4 o’clock in the morning.”

Jock, who retired from broadcasting the same year when Coach Denny Crum left the program, was obviously disappointed with some of the off-the-court activities affecting Louisville basketball in recent years. “The dorm activity never would have happened with Denny,” he said. “There was no way, we had too many people on campus. We had a coach there (in the dorm) every night.  I don’t think Rick Pitino had any idea what was going on.

“That one assistant caused all the problems, and it has cost him dearly. It has cost UofL dearly, too. It’s a shame but the school, the program will recover and come back better than ever.”

Sutherland isn’t fond of some of the changes in basketball over the last few decades. “I have never liked the three-point shot or all the dunking in today’s game,” he said. “I especially don’t like the one-and-done stuff at UK. Fans don’t get to know the players and the players aren’t learning much about the game.”

He says there will never be another Denny Crum and the place will never be the same as when Crum was there. “Denny was a special person. I never heard Denny say a curse word in 20 years. I never saw him embarrass a player in 20 years. Denny never said a word if I was critical during a game.”

He is optimistic about the future of UofL basketball, predicting great things under Chris Mack’s leadership. “They’re coming back, they’ll definitely be back,” he said. “We’ve got a guy here now who has a good reputation and he’s a great recruiter. I guarantee you that in about three years, UofL will back to where it was, competing at the highest levels.”

Sutherland was constantly choking up during the interview, obviously still proud to have worked with the Louisville basketball program, still wondering at times how it was possible.

“I had the worst voice in the world but I did know my subject.  When they bury me, I will take some wonderful memories with me.”

*    *    *

Jock was recently interviewed by film producers Renee Collins and Warren Cobb for Room 17 Productions as part of a documentary about one his former players, Greg Austin. A phenomenal athlete in basketball, football and track, Austin played for Jock’s 1967 team and earned fame as a country music singer. In the interview Jock also reveals how he earned the nickname. 

The Greg Austin Story: Charles “Jock” Sutherland from Renee Collins on Vimeo.

Get on the bandwagon, support UofL through Amazon Smile

May want to get on board. 

For a couple of years now, I have been participating in the Amazon Smile program, in which a portion of the proceeds go a consumer’s favorite charity. My choice, of course, was the University of Louisville Foundation. 

I hadn’t paid much attention to the details, just pleased to see more money going to UofL. You know, wanting to help the alma mater in any way possible, especially during the turmoil of the past couple of years.

An Open Records Request to the University of Louisville was somewhat disappointing, indicating that UofL had only received $73.96 from the program over the last three academic years. Resulting from $14,792 in sales to UofL supporters.

The percentage of Amazon’s gift is .05% of each sale. For example, .05% is only half a penny, a nickel for ever $100 in purchase, or fifty cents from a purchase of $1,000. Even so UofL should be getting much more from the program.

Go to your Amazon account and make the UofL Foundation your charity. When you’re ready to buy, just sign into smile.amazon.com, make your purchase, and Amazon will come through with a donation. What could be easier?