Satterfield quietly maintaining focus on Louisville football

Scott Satterfield on the mound for the University of Louisville (Photo by Jared Anderson).

Some polite applause as Scott Satterfield took to the mound on Tuesday for the ceremonial first pitch prior to the University of Louisville-Vanderbilt baseball game. After a quick acknowledgment, throwing a perfect strike into Zeke Pinkham’s mitt.

Strictly business, watching a few innings before heading back to the Howard Schnellenberger football complex.

Scott Satterfield (Courier-Journal photo).

Pretty obvious from his first few months in town that Satterfield doesn’t bring a ton of charisma to his job as the new University of Louisville football coach. One could be standing behind him in line at the cash register and not make the connection.

Quiet and unassuming, not an individual who’s going to excite the masses with his presence. Never going to resort to hype to sell football tickets, never going to ride an elephant, or compare UofL fans to UK fans. He has more important things to do, faced with the enormous challenge of undoing the damage of his predecessor to the Louisville football program.

The program took an unprecedented nose dive just months after a new board of trustees was installed. Reports surfaced that Bobby Petrino would not be around very long. The former coach owed a lot to former President Jim Ramsey and former Athletic Director Tom Jurich after Petrino’s downfall after the Arkansas scandal.  In the end, a $14 million buyout seemed to be his only motivation.

Rarely has a college football program fallen so quickly and so far than UofL football did under Petrino.

One of Satterfield’s first discoveries was that there seemed to be little rhyme or reason to Petrino’s recruiting practices. More than a dozen wide receivers on hand but only just a handful of offensive linemen, for example. Outside of practice sessions, the players saw very little of Petrino, many of them not even knowing the location of the coach’s office in the football facility.

Petrino was so unlikeable in his profession that he had serious problems hiring and keeping good assistants. So much damage, shaking the very foundations of the program.

So please forgive Scott Satterfield if he seems a bit pre-occupied with all the issues that Petrino left in his wake. Don’t expect any optimistic predictions or quick turnarounds. Not going to be easy, more than likely a long drawn-out grind that’s going to require a lot of patience from fans. 

Scraping bottom at present but, with a coaching staff that actually cares, the program can only get better. Satterfield knows that and has little time for distractions.

Notre Dame is going to pack Cardinal Stadium Sept. 2, hype or no hype.

Satterfield eager to begin Louisville spring football

Scott Satterfield eager to get his player on the football field as spring practice begins Monday.

Two months after he was hired at the University of Louisville, Coach Scott Satterfield was introducing the newest members of his first recruiting class on Wednesday at the Howard Schnellenberger football complex. Now he can finally focus on cleaning up the mess left by his predecessor.

The coach he replaced having lost the confidence and respect of his assistant coaches, the players, the administration and the fans, finishing the 2018 season with a humiliating 2-10 record. Still another unhappy ending from Bobby Petrino. Par for the course for him, but a double whammy for UofL following two tenures.

Satterfield hasn’t had much time to work with the players he inherited from Petrino. When he was hired on December 4th, he was faced with the challenges of hiring an entirely new staff,  evaluating the existing commitments before the early signing date of December 19th, and then hitting the recruiting trail in earnest. 

The UofL coach acknowledged that getting his staff and first recruiting class together was a time-consuming process. He was, however, pleased with reports from the strength coaches that players were making significant progress in the weight room. 

Satterfield will have plenty of time to know his players starting on Monday with the beginning of the spring training camp. He’s not making any assumptions about what went wrong under Petrino, saying everyone is starting off with a clean slate.

He will have 15 days to begin to reverse some of the failures of the second Petrino era, to instill a new culture with a winning attitude, and new offensive and defensive schemes at Louisville. Major challenges for any coach but Satterfield can’t wait to get started.

“The Louisville brand is a good one, the program has had a lot of success, with some major accomplishments,” he said. “The response from high school coaches has been awesome. They know what went on here before and what we want to do. What Louisville has been able to do in the past has been awesome.”

“Our staff did an outstanding job of going out, working their tails off to get the kind of players we need at Louisville,” he said. “We’re glad to get much of the administrative stuff behind us. We’re eager to get out on the field and begin the process of getting better as a football team.

Culture change in high gear for Louisville football

Editor’s Note: Rarely will the Observer go with a release verbatim from the Sports Information Office but this one, penned by UofL’s Stephen Williams, is just too good to pass up:

Culture has been a commonly referenced term for the University of Louisville football program amidst the transition to head coach Scott Satterfield.

Scott Satterfield is rapidly gaining respect in the Louisville football complex.

When Satterfield was introduced as the new head coach of the Cardinals on Dec. 4, culture was a consistent theme of his opening message.

“It starts with our culture, so that’s what we’re going to work on,” Satterfield said in his opening press conference. “That’s what this offseason is going to be about. When you get that stuff straight, then the wins will start coming.”

Satterfield inherits a Louisville program that struggled in 2018, but a roster hungry to put it in the rearview mirror. As winter workouts have reached the halfway point, current Cardinals have taken note of the culture change in progress.

“A lot of it came from the team,” rising junior safety TreSean Smith said. “Guys came in with new energy. They want to get better. Everyone wants to compete at the highest level and get better each and every day.”

The culture change is a process that starts at the top however, with a new coaching staff pushing to get the most out of its players.

“There’s a new vibe from the new coaches coming in from different areas,” Smith added. “They bring in a little bit of their energy and combine that with a little bit of our energy and it works out for us.”

Before the Cardinals step on the field under Satterfield’s watch, the work begins in the weight room under the direction of the new head of strength and conditioning for football, Mike Sirignano.

“They kill us every day, in a good way,” rising sophomore defensive back Chandler Jones commented. “Coach Mike (Sirignano) is real energetic and gets into us and is able to get the best out of us. A lot of us are going to get a lot faster this year.”

Hard work and an increased energy level have been at the forefront of the change in culture, but there’s been an added focus from Satterfield’s staff in one particular area.

“Accountability. They’ve changed a lot of things around,” Smith stated. “You have to be accountable for everything that you do. You’re not late to anything, you’re at everything on time five minutes before. They show no leniency to anyone.”

The Cardinals take the field for the first practice of the spring on Feb. 11.

Scott Satterfield brings expectations for Louisville football

A new face with a refreshing outlook.

There’s a new man in the coach’s office at the Schnellenberger football complex today, an individual who just a couple of weeks ago couldn’t have imagined being there. But there he is sorting through the roster, figuring out who’s going, who’s on the fence and who’s staying with just two weeks before national signing day.

Scott Satterfield has taken on a difficult challenge, that of reversing the fortunes of the University of Louisville football team. A program that tumbled over the cliff this past season, losing its last nine games while allowing more than 50 points on six different occasions. Turning that around could be seen as a daunting task for many coaches.

Athletic Director Vince Tyra, undaunted by a turndown by former UofL great Jeff Brohm, said he was interested in Satterfield from the beginning, fascinated with how Appalachian State had dominated the Sun Belt Conference. Narrow overtime losses to Tennessee and Penn State also intrigued him.

“We wanted a winner, and I wanted someone to want us as badly as we wanted him,” said Tyra. “There was competition for Scott in this process, and I’m glad we were able to stay in front of the competition. He met all of our criteria and expectations. We looked at a number of people during the search process and kept coming back to Scott.”

Clearly Satterfield is able to see beyond the current difficulties, some seeming self-inflicted by the previous head coach, knowing what is possible at UofL.  “I want to compete for national championships one day. That’s what we’re going to be gunning for,” he said during introductory ceremonies.

“To be able to come and coach at this kind of a university to compete for championships, I can’t turn that down at this point in my career. This is what we’ve been shooting for.”

Welcome to Louisville, Scott Satterfield.