Completion of Cardinal Stadium in 2018 will be loud, symbolic

One of the first impressions one had while checking out the expansion of the University of Louisville’s Cardinal Stadium on Tuesday was that Athletic Director Tom Jurich was wise to get the project going a year earlier than anticipated.

By the time the stadium expansion is completed in 2018, much of the controversy surrounding the school administration will have been resolved, with a new President and Board of Trustees firmly committed to returning to the university’s upward trajectory.

The closing in of the football stadium at that time could well symbolize a university that has come full circle overcoming major challenges while pursuing new objectives and milestones.

One got the feeling Tuesday that the closing end of the North end of the stadium is going to enhance the home field advantage (i.e., significantly raising the noise level). It’s going to be very compact, folks, with the new seating capacity of 65,000 fans.

Michael Ortman has the fun job of managing the stadium during another major expansion.

All kinds of activity going on Tuesday at Cardinal Stadium. Even though the spring semester has ended, the parking lots adjacent to the stadium seem to be near capacity. On the south end of the stadium, numerous UofL athletes headed for the Thornton’s Academic Center for Excellence. Some for study (maybe), many for socialization and recreation, and others for the snack bars.

On the third floor of the Brown & Williamson Club, a local organization is setting up for a get-together.  On the fifth floor, Stadium Manager Michael Ortman is meeting with his staff to discuss the challenges of managing the stadium with all the construction occurring during the 2017 football season.

Stadium capacity will have increased by 10,000 seats by the beginning of the 2018 season — to include 1,000 club seats, 70 premium boxes and 12 exclusive field-level suites. Premium seats will access two upscale gathering areas, including Pepsi Club, offering an elevated view of the field, and a lower-level club that will put fans close to the action.

The Schnellenberger Complex will have doubled in size for expanded weight room and conditioning facilities, as well as an enhanced training space with hydrotherapy.

Completion of the project in 2018 could not come at a better time, hopefully with much of the conflict at the university in the past. The stadium expansion reflecting strong support not only for the football program but for a university that serves as the heart and soul of the community.

Update: Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium expansion


Not much new in the way of construction at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium on Friday afternoon, at least inside the stadium.

The earth moving equipment seemed to be about the same place as it was when we last visited about four weeks ago. The only sign of actual construction appeared to be on the beginnings of what appears to be a concrete bunker in the southwest corner.

For now, University of Louisville football fans will have to be happy with a 2017 football recruiting class that has been ranked as high as 20th by some analysts. National signing day is Wednesday, February 1.

Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium expansion update

The end of the 2017 football season may have been a downer for University of Louisville football. However, the future continues to look bright with the expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium.

Lots of work going on on Wednesday, with crews hard at work at the Floyd Street complex. A 10-foot chain link fence has installed just outside the north end zone, where the foundation of the 10,000-seat addition will be visible during the 2017 season.

Work also continues on the front of the football complex, across from the Trager indoor practice facility, where utility lines are being installed.

Painful to watch, Louisville football unable to handle adversity or prosperity

Sorry, but this observer had no choice but to turn the TV channel to another station during the third quarter. The football game was a disaster.

LSU’s dominance of the University of Louisville during the Citrus Bowl confirmed what many had suspected: This UofL football team had fallen from being a national title contender in October to one with zero confidence or aspirations in December.

Lots of symptoms, problems affecting the team’s psyche, with no logical reasons for what appeared to be a near total collapse.

— Probably the weakest offensive line in all of college football, unable to provide any blocking or protection for the quarterback or running backs.

— A team with the largest number of sacks and fumbles in college football. A team that couldn’t didn’t value possessions, unable to hang onto footballs. Turning sure things into unpredictable mishaps.

— A quarterback,  winner of the prestigious Heisman Trophy, unable to call an audible, read a defense or escape a pass rush. Hurrying his passes even when not challenged, unable to hit open receivers, not knowing when to throw the ball away, even while standing in his own end zone.

Something about the composition of this team that couldn't handle adversity or prosperity.

— A coach labeled as an offensive genius unable to make offensive adjustments, forcing his quarterback to keep going long, resulting in a steady diet of hits, sacks and negative yardage. A three-game losing streak to end the most promising season in the school’s history

— A defensive backfield riddled with injuries, providing easy pickings for quarterbacks from Houston, Kentucky and LSU. Need points? Just go to the air against Louisville. Even Jaire Alexander, a second team all-ACC cornerback, resorting to pass interference, still unable to prevent receptions.

This observer has seen a lot of football over six decades, including numerous seasons when many games were over for UofL at the end of the first half. Not many expectations for teams during the first five-and-a-half decades but always optimism that things would get better.

And they did get better, with UofL winning a BCS Orange Bowl in 2007 and a BCS Sugar Bowl in 2013. This year was set to be extra special, with Louisville in the top 10 for much of the season, third for a week or so, fifth and sixth over a couple of weeks. A matter of taking care of business and UofL would have been in contention for the playoffs, possibly a national title.

Something about the composition of this team that couldn’t handle adversity or prosperity. Games against inferior competition became harder, more difficult to win, some decided in the last quarter, one on the final play. Finally, down the stretch they were unable to stop anybody but themselves.

What a letdown, so disappointing. Difficult to fault the fan base for not traveling to Orlando for the Citrus Bowl. Or to blame those watching the final football game on TV for wanting to change the channel. Just too painful to watch, the final chapter in what was once a very promising season.

Johnny U takes a sabbatical, moves to secure location

Johnny U has left his perch at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium.

Johnny Unitas no longer stands guard over the North end zone at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. In his absence is a stub of the concrete statue honoring the former University of Louisville great.

The statue has been moved and won’t be back until the expansion is complete in 2018.

That was the word from JCPS Stadium Manager Michael Ortman who is putting a padlock on Gate 9 a couple of minutes after the observer leaves the stadium on Tuesday morning.

“Where’s Johnny U?” the observer asks.

“I can’t say,” says Ortman. “The statue has been moved to another location where it will be safe and secure.”

“What about the bricks with the donors’ names on them?”

Stadium Manager Michael Ortman.

“They have been palletized,” replies Ortman. “and they are in safekeeping as well.”

“You sure you can’t tell us where Johnny U is being stored?”

“No way,” says Ortman, wondering who the character is asking all the questions. “The statue is in a safe location and I’m not saying anything about the whereabouts.”

As Vice President Tom Jurich promised, the stadium expansion began two days after the final game of the 2016 season. Work is clearly visible in both the north end zone and north of the Howard Schnellenberger football complex. Lots of preparation work for new utilities is under way in both areas. 

The shell of the new end zone structure is expected to be in place during the 2017 football season, along with framework of construction of the new football training facility. 

As for when and where Johnny U will be stationed when he returns , Ortman is equally mum.

“We’ll see,” he says.