Revisited: Corporate Fannies

A current complaint from fans is that too many corporate seats go unused at University of Louisville football games. A company makes a big donation, and deservedly gets tickets in return. But why do many tickets go to waste? The reasons are as varied as the companies.

I’ve got a suggestion for Tom Jurich. Why not put their corporate names or brands on the seats? That way the companies would get more of the public recognition they all seem to want so badly.

Even more important, fans could finally see which companies are or are not following through on their sanctimonious commitments as “good corporate citizens involved in the community.” Fans would thank the companies for their support, or, in the case of the empty seats, ask them directly about why the tickets aren’t used.

The best scenario would be the managers with the tickets to getting off their butts and distribute them to employees.Do you know your company’s policy on distributing tickets? Don’t let them sit in somebody’s desk drawer on game day.

Author: Charlie Springer

Charlie Springer is a former Louisville editor and sportswriter, as well as a public affairs consultant, a UofL grad and longtime fan.

6 thoughts on “Revisited: Corporate Fannies”

  1. Escapism is not my bag. I’ll get basketball fever soon enough. We have challenges/opportunities to work on in football still.

  2. It’s the same at the Lousiville Bats games. All the good seats are empty. The people who pay moncy to see the games are down in the outfield corners.

    Maybe Rick or Eric could do a column to give this “problem” more attention.

  3. Fantastic idea. It’s a win/win, really: “advertising” for the company; “exposure” when they don’t fill their seats.

  4. Wes: I suspect the tickets are winding up in some desk drawer. Some lazy community relations manager needs to her or his butt in gear. One problem were I worked was the person in charge of them just kept them available in case a vice president called for them. That’s not fair to other employees.

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